English as an Additional Language Guidance

The Bell Foundation provides guidance to school staff about supporting provision for learners who use EAL. This section includes guidance for schools and professionals under two categories: Guidance for Schools and Guidance for Initial Teacher Training Providers.

Guidance for Schools

This guidance focuses on different aspects of provision for learners who use English as an Additional Language, such as effective teaching of learners who use EAL (including the Great Ideas pages), guidance by curriculum subject, parental engagement and bilingual support. It is aimed at teachers, members of senior leadership teams, EAL co-ordinators and teaching assistants.

Some of the guidance in this section of the website was formerly available on EAL Nexus.

To find out more please see the boxes below or on the right.

Guidance for Initial Teacher Training Providers

This guidance for initial teacher programme providers, leads and tutors, aims to support them to prepare their student teachers to work in diverse multilingual classrooms and meet the learning needs of their EAL pupils.

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Guidance for schools

The Great Ideas pages are a collection of different strategies that any teacher could use in their classrooms to support learners who use EAL.

This page provides useful resources for schools welcoming newly arrived learners who speak English as an Additional Language (EAL).

These pages provide guidance and resources to support schools and teachers working with pupils who use EAL and their families to mitigate any learning and language loss experienced during school closures.

Making home learning accessible to EAL learners.  These pages provide guidance and resources to support schools and teachers in working with pupils who use EAL and their families during school closures.

This page provides guidance for senior leaders, teachers, learners and parents on the allocation of exam grades to pupils who use EAL.

Research shows that it is beneficial to provide opportunities for learners to use all their languages to both access the curriculum and to develop their proficiency in English as an Additional Language (EAL).

The term “EAL” is used to describe a diverse and heterogeneous group of learners who speak English as an Additional Language.

Learners joining schools in England from overseas come from many different countries, as well as ethnic, religious, political and social class backgrounds, and languages.

There are almost 1.6 million pupils who use EAL in maintained schools in England, a number which has more than doubled since 2006. This makes pupils who use EAL a key characteristic of student bodies in many schools.

Historical background to EAL provision in England.

Most schools will have several policies which have relevance to the teaching, learning and well-being of learners who use EAL.

A toolkit of resources that can help teachers evaluate their schools’ current practice in making provision for learners who use EAL.

What are the the social, academic and linguistic benefits of integrating students who use EAL into mainstream lessons?

EAL teaching aims to teach English using the mainstream curriculum as the context.  This section of the website includes 20 Great Ideas pages.

The Department for Education, the Teachers’ Standards and Ofsted expect that all learners, including those using EAL, are provided with instruction that allows them to develop knowledge and skills across the curriculum.

This page provides guidance for schools on how to help the parents of EAL learners to support home learning and includes leaflets in 17 languages which are free to download.

Guidance for Initial Teacher Training Providers

Evidence-informed EAL content recommendations for ITE curricula in line with the ITT Core Content Framework.